Fredo: literally the best dog

CHLOE SFERRA ‘20

News Editor

Whoever said diamonds are a girl’s best friend clearly never had a pet. Over spring break, my family unexpectedly had to put down my loving red fox lab.

Everyday I think about the fact that I will never get to see his puppy face or scratch his soft ears.

I would come home and look around to see where he was, but then remembered I would never find him. It made me realize that this dog has taught me so much more than any other being I have ever known.

What I learned from my big, stubborn Fredo were traits that I didn’t understand would be so hard to transition into my life. Traits such as taking the time to listen, loving unconditionally, and knowing that anyone can receive forgiveness.

I know that anyone who loves their pets as much as I loved my dog will understand the powerful impact animals have on life. Whenever I was stressed out and couldn’t tell anyone what I was thinking, Fredo snuggled up next to me and listened. He didn’t understand or care, but I needed him there.

Fredo also grew to have a need of never being alone, a need that I absolutely supported. His desire for human presence showed me that despite being a pretty selfish dog, he loved just as much as he was loved, no matter what.

Because yes there were times where I got mad at Fredo. Yet, he always gave me so much attention. I thought that if the most innocent creatures in the world could forgive people, then why can’t everyone learn to forgive more?

I hate to admit that these were not things I realized easily. It seems like common sense, to listen, love, and forgive, but it takes more effort than expected. The way to get rid of hate is to love everyone, like Fredo did.

He made no distinction between people. He wasn’t picky about who pet him or gave him food. Animals don’t see the bad in people, but humans are blinded by it. He had more respect than any person I know.

The point I am trying to make is I urge everyone to remember to show your animals, and all animals, love and respect.They have more of those qualities than we think we have.

A few weeks ago I wrote a feature article on pets at Denison. If you have one of those pets, remember that this is not a typical living environment for them and they need more care than you might think. Pay attention to them as well. They have a lot to share.

And to my angel dog that has left, thank you for showing me how to be more caring. Thank you for being so lazy, selfish, and rude. Thank you for being so sweet, so cuddly, and so friendly to everyone you met. Anyone who knew you would agree with the title of this paper. You were always the only one there for me consistently. Fredo, you’ll never know the positive change you made in my life, but I will never forget. Love ya buddy!

Chloe Sferra ‘20 is undecided from Chagrin Falls, Ohio.